Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Can Spotless Minds Really Bring Eternal Sunshine?

Yesterday I had a Channing Tatum night. Unfortunately, that doesn't mean I spent it with someone who looked like Tatum, or as good as Tatum, or -- better yet! -- the real thing. Instead, I passed a portion of my Sunday evening marveling at Tatum's specimen of physical perfection on display in two of his three 2012 hits, The Vow and Magic Mike, which were playing simultaneously on two different South African DStv channels, while being underwhelmed by his acting range, or rather, lack thereof.

I'm no expert on his oeuvre, having now seen exactly four films starring or costarring Tatum -- She's the Man, Magic Mike, Side Effects and, as of last night, The Vow -- but judging from my personal viewing evidence, he seems to excel at playing hunky nice guys in bad-boy packaging because muscles and taut washboard abs scream bad to the bone. (Well, I suppose his white-collar criminal in this year's Side Effects was no pillar of society, but we caught up with him after he'd done his crime and his time, which, unfortunately for him, wasn't his final price to pay. Ouch!)

Although I missed the first 15 minutes or so of The Vow last night, having read the reviews last year when it was out in theaters (and on the way to becoming the sixth highest-grossing romantic drama in history, according to Wikipedia), I knew the back story. So I understood why there was so much quiet tension in the first scene I saw, the one in which Tatum's character, Leo, was about to take home his amnesiac wife (Paige, played by Rachel McAdams, who is a far more effective and exciting actress in brittle, bitch mode -- see Mean Girls and Midnight in Paris). If I remembered what I had read in those negative reviews correctly, the couple had been in a terrible car accident that left Paige without several years worth of memories after she regained consciousness. (Hey, what was Jessica Lange doing in this picture?! She's always welcome on my TV or big screen.)

Watching Paige stare blankly at Leo, I asked myself, "Where's the drama?" Was I supposed to feel sorry for a sleeping beauty who awakens from her slumber with no memory of a guy who looks like Channing Tatum standing over her, love and concern gushing forth from his eyes? There should be only one thing left to say: "Take me... home!" That lucky girl.

Of course, for the sake of drama, the movie pretended that Leo wasn't being played by one of the sexiest men alive, so Paige was torn. She didn't remember her beautiful, devoted husband, and her memory was being extremely selective when it came to her family (and how thrilled her parents, played by Lange and Sam Neill, appeared to be about that little twist), from whom she apparently had been estranged before the accident. 

Was she better off without all of the bitter memories of her terrible falling out with her folks and all of the pain it had caused, even if it meant that she didn't remember her own hot husband? At least she had her other selectively positive memories, the ones of her former love Jeremy (played by Scott Speedman), who was ready to pounce again despite now being spoken for. Channing Tatum or Scott Speedman? That lucky girl. Again, where was the drama?

I suppose the drama would be in losing huge chunks of your life and having people you don't remember telling you how important you are too each other. It must be like those mornings when you wake up momentarily not knowing who you are or where you are. Imagine if that confusion lasted all day, every day, indefinitely. Or waking up from a blackout night out, and having your friends tell you about all of the embarrassing things you did the night before, none of which you can recall. That must have been how Paige felt.

The Vow played as torture what had been the main goal for Jim Carrey's and Kate Winslet's characters, ex-lovers reunited in reverse, in the 2004 film The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. In the later movie, we were meant to identify with the trials and tribulations of waking up with a blank slate, and in the earlier one, we were sold the benefits. Both had a similar effect on me. After watching them, I found myself dwelling on the pros of pressing delete on some of the sordid, but unforgettable aspects of my past. If I happened to have Channing Tatum hovering over me, vowing to get me through, all the better.

But now that I've had a night to sleep on it, I realize the folly of my desire to edit my own history. As much as I'd like to file away some of those low points in a place where I can no longer access them, I couldn't imagine the person I would be without them. Would I be as bland and cranky as Paige in The Vow? What would I talk about? What would I write about? What would I think about? It's as much my pursuit of happiness as my memories of sadness that drives me every day, makes me the person I am. Without one, would the other have any meaning?

I'd rather go on spending way too much time focusing on lost loves and hard times, if it means that I'll appreciate the good times ahead even more, if it guarantees that despite the occasional bout of writer's block, I'll always eventually have something to write about. Without your memories what is there to talk about, to laugh about, to cry about, to think about? 

The way I react to so many things in the present -- like my recent trip to the Apartheid Museum in Johannesburg -- depends on the personal history that I bring to my experiences. It might not always be pleasant, but as I learned yesterday, after a rainy, blustery Friday and Saturday gave way to a sunny Sunday, stormy weather makes clear skies appear even more blue.

I wouldn't want to forget the dreariness of the first half of the weekend because I'll need it for future reference, when the storm clouds roll in again. Then I'll remember that with weather, as with life, every time the rain starts to fall, a rainbow is right behind it. Sunshine always eventually follows.

"Sweetness Follows" R.E.M.


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