Saturday, June 27, 2015

Why I had to un-friend my favorite aunt on Facebook today

"I don't understand it, but I accept it."

Those words would have to rank near the top of my list of the most annoying things straight people say about gay people. What they're really saying: "You're sinners, but you're here and you're queer, so what choice do we have but to put up with you?"

Despite serious misgivings, I decided to let it go when my Aunt Juliet did the whole song and dance at my brother Jeff's wedding 11 years ago. I had just introduced her to my then-boyfriend Khleber, and I was so determined not to ruin Jeff's big day that I let it pass when she started talking about how sad she was that I would miss out on a spouse and kids, all the things that heterosexuality would have supposedly granted me that she herself was living without.

Come to think of it, Jeff's wedding day wasn't the best moment to be gay. The stench of homophobia was in the air, and my Uncle Achille, who was performing the ceremony, made an even bigger stink than Juliet.

I was best man, and I was so nervous about getting it right that I totally missed the thing Achille said about two men in the Garden of Eden. Being the fire-and-brimstone Bible thumper I'd always known him to be, he couldn't just leave a tender moment alone. He had to drop in some judgment, which, in hindsight, I realize was totally for my benefit and for that of my brother Alexi, who is also gay.

He made some crack about how God created Adam and Eve, not "Hemp and Shemp" ...or something to that effect. The names are not as relevant as the intended message: God hates you, faggots. Fortunately, both the words and the message went over my head because my head was elsewhere.

Wait, where's the ring?…Oh, there it is.

When my mother repeated her former brother-in-law's comment later at the reception, her voice dripping with disgust, she was furious. It was actually my first time hearing it, and I wasn't sure if her reaction was about what Achille had said or the forum in which he'd chosen to say it. I decided she was angry for me and for Alexi, and I loved her for it.

As for my uncle, I had only one personal encounter with him at the wedding. It was when he walked into the men's room and caught Khleber and me in a warm embrace. He glared at us but didn't say a word, not even when I directly addressed him and asked how he was doing. I bit my tongue and let his silent treatment go. He'd always been my least favorite uncle, and I knew I'd probably never see or speak to him again after Jeff's wedding day.

Now I can say the same thing about Juliet, who today became the first family member ever to be un-friended by me on Facebook. The deal breaker arrived on the morning shortly after I learned that the U.S. Supreme Court had declared gay marriage legal. It was wrapped in big box of hate and re-posted on Facebook:


The post itself isn't even worth debating. It's passive-aggressive drivel, hate dressed up in Sunday church clothes. If you think I'm a sinner who is going to hell, if you don't support me or marriage between my kind, I have absolutely no use for your "love" or "friendship." As for the alleged name-calling and stereotyping, if you're going to walk the homophobic walk and talk the talk, be prepared to be taken down for it.

But on a more personal level, why would a woman who has at least three gay nephews spread this message in a place where she knows they'll likely read it? Was she trying to douse a celebratory occasion with some good old-fashioned negativity, just as my uncle did on my brother's wedding day?

Here's the thing about homophobia. Like racism, it doesn't always carry a pitchfork and twirl its moustache. My Aunt Juliet would probably never openly criticize me or my life. The last time I spoke to her, we had a perfectly pleasant conversation. But at the end of the day, she thinks I'm defective. She can hide behind "love" and the Bible all she wants, but she's homophobic. I have as much use for homophobes as I do for racists. As the kids say (or at least used to), deuces.

Alexi, who tends to take this sort of thing better than I do, may or may not agree with my reaction to the latest incident of homophobia within our family ranks. But I'm pretty sure he understands and accepts it. That's a lot more than I ever got from others who have called me family.

I can do better...and I already have.
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